Interview: Suhaly Bautista-Carolina on the Radical Futurity of Art – Epistemic Unruliness 16

In this installment of Epistemic Unruliness, James talks with Suhaly Bautista-Carolina, also known as “The Earth Warrior.” In addition to her work as Director of Programs at the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute (CCCADI) in Harlem and Community Relations Manager of the Brooklyn Museum, Suhaly engages the world as an artist, educator, and cultural advocate. The conversation focuses on how the practice of art stirs the political imagination towards alternative futures, as Suhaly and James discuss several of her artistic endeavors, including an Afrofuturist book club and an AfroLatinX salon and portrait project, among others.

Please support us on Patreon to help with recording equipment. Triple thanks to patrons Matthew R and Matthew S, double thanks to Steve and Angel, and thanks to Bunnie and Lieke.

Requests for texts for us to discuss? Dreams for us to interpret? Advice questions for us to answer? Email us at alwaysalreadypodcast AT gmail DOT com. Subscribe on iTunes. Follow us on Twitter. Like our Facebook page. RSS feed here. Thanks to Leah Dion, Jordan Cass, and B for the music. Get the mp3 of the episode here.

Links!

 

unnamed

Advertisements

Interview with Emily Martinez and Liat Berdugo on art, neoliberal subjectivity, and the sharing economy – Epistemic Unruliness 4

On this episode, James talks with Liat Berdugo and Emily Martinez, a duo of activists-artists from California currently working on the Making You, Making Others project. The conversation covers the sharing economy – what is it and how it reveals the anxious substratum of neoliberal subjectivity. We also discuss the neoliberal problem of approaching one’s life as an entrepreneurial venture that one “makes”, as well as how art can provide a venue for the construction of alternative subjectivities and momentarily undo normal perception to give a glimpse of other possible realities. This was a fun one!

Visit their project’s website here; view the first video from their project here. Find Emily and Liat online at Emily’s website; Liat’s website; Emily’s twitter, and Liat’s twitter.

Requests for texts for us to discuss? Dreams for us to interpret? Advice questions for us to answer? Ideas for interview? Email us at alwaysalreadypodcast AT gmail DOT com. Subscribe on iTunes. Follow us on Twitter. Like our Facebook page. Get the mp3 of the episode here. RSS feed here. Thanks to Rocco & Lizzie and to B for the music.

 

How to Make Yourself into a Commissioning Body in 5 Easy Steps

EmilyMartinez-LiatBerdugo-3

EmilyMartinez-LiatBerdugo-5

Ep.11 – Rancière, The Distribution of the Sensible

This episode we discuss Jacques Rancière’s “The Distribution of the Sensible” from The Politics of AestheticsWe start by parsing the first sentence of this text for several minutes, which sets the tone for a discussion of the interconnectedness between aesthetics and politics and the “self-evident” systems of the political order that determine that which is visible/invisible, audible and silent, and even thinkable and unthinkable. Listen as we debate the merits and demerits of exclusion as a concept, the bodiless embodiment of Rancière, and the potential for prefigurative politics found in this work. We’ll also give shoddy advice to our friends Fritz and Alexis about the weather and PhD application writing samples, respectively.

Thanks for Katie for suggesting we read Rancière. Requests for texts for us to discuss? Advice questions to submit? Email us at alwaysalreadypodcast AT gmail DOT com. Subscribe on iTunes. Like our Facebook page. Get the mp3 here. RSS feed here. This episode’s music by B (intro and outro) and Jordan Cass (inter-segment).

Links!

A distribution of the sensible at criticaltheorydesigns.wordpress.com

A distribution of the sensible at criticaltheorydesigns.wordpress.com

Interview: James Padilioni Jr. on St. Martín de Porres, modernity, and black radical theology and aesthetics

Join John as he interviews James Padilioni Jr., a doctoral student in American Studies at the College of William and Mary. Building out from a discussion of Padilioni Jr.’s paper “Mortified but Incorruptible: The Radical Black Mysticism of St. Martín de Porres,” we learn about St. Martín, a mulato lay brother in the Dominican order in colonial Lima, Peru and how his practices as well as the cult that grew after his death open up ways to think about black radical aesthetics, theology, and political traditions in relation to colonial modernity. The conversation covers Spanish colonialism, the construction of racialized bodies, Catholic mysticism, the experience of blackness and a black dialectical struggle life, sainthood as a radical alternative practice and subjectivity, and time travelling with Hegel.

Requests for texts for us to discuss? Advice questions to submit? Email us at alwaysalreadypodcast AT gmail DOT com. Subscribe on iTunes. Like our Facebook page. Get the mp3 here. RSS feed here. This episode’s music by B.

Links!

James Padilioni Jr., on the roof of the monastery where St. Martín lived

James Padilioni Jr., on the roof of the monastery where St. Martín lived, el Convento de Santo Domingo