Ep.11 – Rancière, The Distribution of the Sensible

This episode we discuss Jacques Rancière’s “The Distribution of the Sensible” from The Politics of AestheticsWe start by parsing the first sentence of this text for several minutes, which sets the tone for a discussion of the interconnectedness between aesthetics and politics and the “self-evident” systems of the political order that determine that which is visible/invisible, audible and silent, and even thinkable and unthinkable. Listen as we debate the merits and demerits of exclusion as a concept, the bodiless embodiment of Rancière, and the potential for prefigurative politics found in this work. We’ll also give shoddy advice to our friends Fritz and Alexis about the weather and PhD application writing samples, respectively.

Thanks for Katie for suggesting we read Rancière. Requests for texts for us to discuss? Advice questions to submit? Email us at alwaysalreadypodcast AT gmail DOT com. Subscribe on iTunes. Like our Facebook page. Get the mp3 here. RSS feed here. This episode’s music by B (intro and outro) and Jordan Cass (inter-segment).

Links!

A distribution of the sensible at criticaltheorydesigns.wordpress.com

A distribution of the sensible at criticaltheorydesigns.wordpress.com

Interview: James Padilioni Jr. on St. Martín de Porres, modernity, and black radical theology and aesthetics

Join John as he interviews James Padilioni Jr., a doctoral student in American Studies at the College of William and Mary. Building out from a discussion of Padilioni Jr.’s paper “Mortified but Incorruptible: The Radical Black Mysticism of St. Martín de Porres,” we learn about St. Martín, a mulato lay brother in the Dominican order in colonial Lima, Peru and how his practices as well as the cult that grew after his death open up ways to think about black radical aesthetics, theology, and political traditions in relation to colonial modernity. The conversation covers Spanish colonialism, the construction of racialized bodies, Catholic mysticism, the experience of blackness and a black dialectical struggle life, sainthood as a radical alternative practice and subjectivity, and time travelling with Hegel.

Requests for texts for us to discuss? Advice questions to submit? Email us at alwaysalreadypodcast AT gmail DOT com. Subscribe on iTunes. Like our Facebook page. Get the mp3 here. RSS feed here. This episode’s music by B.

Links!

James Padilioni Jr., on the roof of the monastery where St. Martín lived

James Padilioni Jr., on the roof of the monastery where St. Martín lived, el Convento de Santo Domingo

Episode 1: Deleuze and Guattari; Susan Buck-Morss on history, temporality, secularism, and critical theory

This inaugural episode features a conversation about Chapter 1, Desiring Machines from Deleuze and Guattari’s major work, Anti-Oedipus. Rachel, B, and John tackled the thorny concepts of action and agency, subjectivity, machines, and desire, as well as the connection this reading has with practice(s) of everyday life. Your hosts did their very best to unpack the Marx-Freud doublet that preoccupied this chapter’s brilliant critiques of capitalism and psychoanalysis.

We then feature part 1 of our wide-ranging interview with critical theorist/philosopher Susan Buck-Morss, and end by giving advice on setting up one’s dissertation committee and answering an age-old philosophical conundrum.

Requests for texts for us to discuss? Advice questions to submit? Email us at alwaysalreadypodcast AT gmail DOT com. Subscribe on iTunes.

Thanks to Jordan Cass for the music performed throughout the episode.

Links

Richard Lindner,

“A painting by Richard Lindner, ‘Boy with Machine,’ shows a huge, pudgy, bloated boy working one of his little desiring machines, after having hooked it up to a vast technical and social machine – which, as we shall see, is what even the very young child does” (Anti-Oedipus, 7)